DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS AND LEGISLATION

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WATER INDUSTRY FEATURES, INSIGHTS, AND ANALYSIS

  • Nutrient Sensor Action Challenge Winners: Data And Decisions To Manage Excess Nutrients
    Nutrient Sensor Action Challenge Winners: Data And Decisions To Manage Excess Nutrients

    Nutrients in the environment from excess nitrogen and phosphorous can result in negative impacts on water quality. EPA is improving nutrient management by incentivizing the development of low-cost technology solutions, such as nutrient sensors, in collaboration with USGS, USDA, NIST, NOAA, and the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS).

  • WRF Hosts Capitol Hill, State-Of-The-Science Briefing On Harmful Algal Blooms
    WRF Hosts Capitol Hill, State-Of-The-Science Briefing On Harmful Algal Blooms

    To make informed decisions about how to limit exposure to cyanotoxins, utilities need information to select and implement a comprehensive and technically sound management approach. The Water Research Foundation (WRF) has been actively involved in developing effective innovative solutions to help utilities address this challenge and protect public health.

  • How Giving Legal Rights To Nature Could Help Reduce Toxic Algae Blooms In Lake Erie
    How Giving Legal Rights To Nature Could Help Reduce Toxic Algae Blooms In Lake Erie

    August and September are peak months for harmful blooms of algae in western Lake Erie. This year’s outbreak covered more than 620 square miles by mid-August. These blooms, which can kill fish and pets and threaten public health, are driven mainly by agricultural pollution and increasingly warm waters due to climate change.

  • Are We Really Protecting Rivers And Streams From Pollution? It’s Hard To Say, And That’s A Problem
    Are We Really Protecting Rivers And Streams From Pollution? It’s Hard To Say, And That’s A Problem

    More public and private resources than ever are being directed to protecting and preserving aquatic ecosystems and watersheds. Whether mandated for land development, farming, or in response to the growing severity and number of natural disasters, scientists from Drexel University found evidence that decades of watershed restoration and mitigation projects have taken place, but their impact is mostly perceived.

  • A Messy Problem Inspires An Award-Winning Solution
    A Messy Problem Inspires An Award-Winning Solution

    Denver Water and engineering partners resolve major water quality challenge in crucial South Platte River exchange reservoirs.

  • Drinking Water Challenges On The Rise
    Drinking Water Challenges On The Rise

    University of Miami professors who study water treatment and civil engineering say that water contamination issues point to human error.

  • Denver Water Proposes Innovative Plan To Remove An Estimated 75,000 Lead Service Lines In 15 Years
    Denver Water Proposes Innovative Plan To Remove An Estimated 75,000 Lead Service Lines In 15 Years

    Recently, Denver Water’s board approved its proposed “Lead Reduction Program Plan” to fully replace the estimated 75,000 lead service lines (LSLs) in their system within 15 years. The plan is an innovative solution that will remove the primary source of lead within Denver Water’s system, while avoiding the use of orthophosphate that can further exacerbate nutrient pollution problems in rivers, streams, and oceans.

  • Wildfires: How Do They Affect Our Water Supplies?
    Wildfires: How Do They Affect Our Water Supplies?

    Wildfire is a natural part of many ecosystems, but recently these fires have become more severe, burning more acres and causing destruction in the western parts of the United States. Recently, U.S. EPA researchers have begun to look at the impact of these fires on our water supply, the natural resource we depend on for drinking, irrigation, fishing, and recreation.

  • EPA Researchers Develop Strategies And Methods To Help Predict Harmful Algal Blooms In Kansas
    EPA Researchers Develop Strategies And Methods To Help Predict Harmful Algal Blooms In Kansas

    Harmful algal blooms are a significant concern for many communities across the U.S. These blooms occur when cyanobacteria grow out of control in fresh and marine waters, often because of excess phosphorus and nitrogen from stormwater runoff and other sources such as fertilizers entering the water.

  • Septic’s Consequences — The Embodiment Of Unnatural Disasters
    Septic’s Consequences — The Embodiment Of Unnatural Disasters

    While septic systems are a viable and undeniably popular choice for wastewater treatment, they are ultimately only as reliable as their upkeep. Can we trust the technology and the human element to protect our waterways from pollution, or is it time to search for better solutions?

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DRINKING WATER PRODUCTS

NeoTech D438™ NeoTech D438™

The NeoTech D438™ is specially designed to disinfect water and is an essential component in advanced oxidation processes.

Ion Exchange Resins Reduce Pollution From Refineries Ion Exchange Resins Reduce Pollution From Refineries

A single operational oil and gas refinery produces millions of gallons of contaminated wastewater a year, leading to environmental pollution concerns. Ion exchange resins are a metal- and ion-removal solution to help clean this wastewater for plant reuse or safe disposal. This application guide explains how resins can be used to demineralize refinery water in process, boiler, and cooling water applications.

Emerging Pollutants:  The Role Of Activated Carbons Emerging Pollutants: The Role Of Activated Carbons

The presence of active pharmaceutical ingredients, radio-opaque substances and endocrine disrupting chemicals in raw water sources is a relatively new emerging issue in relation to drinking water quality. However, the influence of pollutants on health and general well-being is becoming apparent with the incidence of carcinoma increasing and fertility rates being affected. A solution for the efficient removal of these substances from water use by production sites is required.

NeoTech D238™ NeoTech D238™

The NeoTech D238™ is specially designed to disinfect water and is an essential component in advanced oxidation processes.

WATER<i>TRAK</i>&trade; Light Industrial Reverse Osmosis WATERTRAK™ Light Industrial Reverse Osmosis
The LRL Series is a truly engineered system. From pretreatment through RO tank level and posttreatment, the LRL RO family becomes a “system” by simply activating standard features.
NIROBOX&trade; BW NIROBOX™ BW

Nirobox BW lets you tap into previously unusable groundwater sources.

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VIEWS ON THE LATEST REGS

  • The Mainstreaming Of Potable Reuse
    The Mainstreaming Of Potable Reuse

    With ever-growing demand for water resources, the reuse discussion has been building for years. More utilities are considering it, policy is being created around it, and new technologies are making it more efficient. To better understand the evolving landscape, Water Talk sat down with Brown and Caldwell's regional One Water leader, Allegra da Silva.

  • EPA Outlines Possible Solutions To Looming Perchlorate Limits
    EPA Outlines Possible Solutions To Looming Perchlorate Limits

    The U.S. EPA is gearing up to limit perchlorate in public drinking water systems, so municipalities should start preparing to adopt the appropriate testing and treatment technologies. In a recent report, the agency identified several technologies as the best available to address the perchlorate problem.

  • My Most Personal Initiation To PFAS
    My Most Personal Initiation To PFAS

    When I attended the U.S. EPA-hosted PFAS Summit held at the Horsham, PA high school auditorium on July 25, 2018, the education I received from state and municipal leaders focusing on the local problem was more than just a professional briefing. It was ominously personal, due to the fact that the Water Online editorial office where I work and drink water every day is served by a utility sitting smack-dab in the middle of one of the most concentrated PFAS hotspots in the U.S.

  • The ABCs Of PFCs
    The ABCs Of PFCs

    Nick Burns, director of water treatment technology for (the Americas region of) Black & Veatch, discusses the health concerns, current regulatory status, and documented presence of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), also sometimes called perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), in drinking water supplies — as determined by sampling under the U.S. EPA's Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule 3 (UCMR3).

  • What Did Rural America Do To Deserve This?

    By now, just about everyone in the U.S. has heard about Flint, Michigan’s water woes. Despite the many issues raised by that incident, urban water systems are not the sole reason the 2017 Report Card from the American Society of Civil Engineers gives the U.S. drinking water infrastructure an overall “D” grade. Hidden within that disheartening rating are the harsh realities faced by rural water systems.

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MORE WATER INDUSTRY FEATURES

  • The Role Of Activated Carbon In Short-Chain PFAS Removal
    The Role Of Activated Carbon In Short-Chain PFAS Removal

    Water utilities around the country are trying to get a handle on their PFAS problem. While the presence of legacy PFAS is well known, lesser understood replacements such as short-chain PFAS are emerging as a major issue. The short-chain compounds are particularly important because they can be more difficult to remove. In this Water Talk interview, Adam Redding, technical director for drinking water solutions for Calgon Carbon, discusses the science and economics behind effective solutions for treating water for short-chain PFAS and other contaminants.

  • TOC Analysis: The Best Tool In A Drinking Water Facility’s Toolbox
    TOC Analysis: The Best Tool In A Drinking Water Facility’s Toolbox

    SUEZ Water Technologies & Solutions designs and manufactures Sievers Total Organic Carbon (TOC) Analyzers that enable near real-time reporting of organic carbon levels for treatment optimization, quality control & regulatory compliance. TOC has a wide range of applicability at a drinking water plant, and therefore any drinking water utility — large or small — can measure TOC in their laboratory or online in their treatment process.

  • Water Monitoring's Triple Threat: Bad Habits, Bad Readings, Bad Results
    Water Monitoring's Triple Threat: Bad Habits, Bad Readings, Bad Results

    When water and wastewater plant operators can’t get accurate flow measurements or analytical readings — or lack confidence in their instruments’ readings — it creates challenges with the process. When substandard water goes to homes and causes a boil order, or discharge pollutes a lake or reservoir, the resulting bad press, fines, and potential lawsuits erode public confidence. Avoiding these kinds of problems is rooted in good preventive maintenance habits.

  • Chlorine vs. Chloramine: A Tale Of Two Chemistries

    In drinking water treatment’s ongoing battle between disinfection and disinfection byproducts (DBPs), most water utility customers are oblivious to the process. One thing they do notice, however, is when their water smells or tastes bad. Here are some insights that can help water treatment plant (WTP) operators deal with their internal concerns about DBPs and residual chlorine or ammonia levels, as well as their external concerns about customer perceptions of water quality.

  • Seal The Deal: Shielding Against A Mag Meter’s Achilles Heel
    Seal The Deal: Shielding Against A Mag Meter’s Achilles Heel

    When it comes to metering water flow — drinking water or wastewater — full-bore mag meters offer many advantages. While the underlying technology based on Faraday’s Law of electromagnetic induction is shared among all styles of full-bore mag meters, specific implementations have impacts on longevity and accuracy. Here is what to look for when the time to choose arrives.

  • Billions Of Gallons Of Treated Water Irrigates U.S. Lawns

    For most of the United States, we’ve reached the time of year where Americans desire to maintain a perfectly green lawn starts to be tested by the warmer and dryer summer months. From the water industry’s perspective, it’s staggering just how many billions of gallons of treated water ends up being sprayed across our hallowed front and back yards in maintaining a full and aesthetically-pleasing lawn.

  • Clearing Up Misconceptions About Turbidimeter Performance And Calibration

    There is little doubt about the importance of taking turbidity readings as part of drinking water treatment. However, there are certain misperceptions about the associated requirements and procedures needed to confirm the validity of those readings. The major points of confusion seem to revolve around perception of the terms “approved,” “calibration,” and “validation.” Here is a quick synopsis on what you really need to know about meeting U.S. EPA Method 180.1: Determination of Turbidity by Nephelometry for accurate turbidity readings.

  • Maximizing AMI Investments Through Broader IIoT Insight
    Maximizing AMI Investments Through Broader IIoT Insight

    Advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) has received a lot of attention in recent years, typically regarding customer account billing. Other AMI uses within water distribution networks, however, can play equally important roles in reducing non-revenue water (NRW). Consider these contributions of networked flow meter use for automating better insights into water distribution efficiency.

  • How To Cut Costs Through RO Process Optimization – Flow Reversal RO
    How To Cut Costs Through RO Process Optimization – Flow Reversal RO

    As fresh water supplies dwindle, search for “new water” increases, and regulations become more stringent, reverse osmosis systems have gained popularity among utilities. Their ability to treat brackish or salty water and to remove numerous contaminants provide opportunities to treat lower quality waters or reclaim treated effluent. Most concerns about reverse osmosis relate to high costs, concentrate management, and low recovery rates.

  • Dangerous Waters In A Changing World
    Dangerous Waters In A Changing World

    Americans and Canadians got a peek into the future when the City of Toledo shut its drinking water taps in 2014, issuing a do-not-drink order on the municipal water supplies serving 500,000 people. Levels of microcystin, a potent liver toxin produced by blue-green algae, were more than double the World Health Organization's safe limit. More than 700 square miles of the Lake Erie surface was covered by a harmful algal bloom (HAB), and drinking water plants couldn't remove the algal cells and the toxins they produced.

  • X-Ray Inspection Of Candy And Sweets
    X-Ray Inspection Of Candy And Sweets

    From inspecting for foreign body contaminants to complying with food safety regulations, cand makers must implement food safety programs to safeguard brand reputation and protect consumers.

  • Microbiology Fills QC Role At A CDMO In Aseptic Filling And Sampling
    Microbiology Fills QC Role At A CDMO In Aseptic Filling And Sampling

    Microbiological contamination is at the top of the CDMO threat list. A CDMO needs to have clearly defined procedures and allow client access to data.

  • Setting A Precedent: American And Others Work To Ensure Oregon Water System Meets Rigorous Seismic Safety Standards
    Setting A Precedent: American And Others Work To Ensure Oregon Water System Meets Rigorous Seismic Safety Standards

    Most agree that Oregon, with its breathtaking mountains and rugged coastline, is a scenic wonder. Yet the geologic forces that make it so spectacular also make it one of the most earthquake-prone spots in the country.

  • SPRWS Upgrades To Corrosion-Resistant Zinc-Coated Ductile Iron Water Main
    SPRWS Upgrades To Corrosion-Resistant Zinc-Coated Ductile Iron Water Main

    It is no secret that a large portion of the drinking water infrastructure in the United States is near or past its intended design life. Our nation’s water infrastructure needs an overhaul, and the cost of doing so is climbing rapidly. The American Society of Civil Engineering’s 2017 Infrastructure Report Card graded the nation’s drinking water infrastructure a D. According to the American Water Works Association, an estimated $1 trillion is necessary to maintain and expand drinking water service to meet demands over the next 25 years.

  • How To Take Charge of Your Water Quality Analysis For Chlorine Disinfection

    The use of chlorine to treat and disinfect drinking water and wastewater has been in practice for decades, with the earliest recorded attempt dating all the way back to 1893. Since then, it has come a long way.

  • The Microbes Have Us Outnumbered 20 To 1: Should We Be Worried?
    The Microbes Have Us Outnumbered 20 To 1: Should We Be Worried?

    A lot has changed over the past 15 years. Back in the early 2000s, many utilities weren’t interested in understanding what was in their water beyond the contaminant and disinfection byproduct levels they were regulated to comply with. But as Pat Whalen, President and CEO of LuminUltra, explains in this ACE 2018 Water Talk interview, a steady stream of ongoing education and the modern data storage and analytics that cloud computing provides, has developed some rabid fans eager to explore the microbiology of their water systems.

  • Using Advanced Tools To Stem The Lost Revenue Tide
    Using Advanced Tools To Stem The Lost Revenue Tide

    From the largest metropolitan utilities to the smallest water systems, leaks are a problem everywhere. Because it’s difficult to raise consumer prices to offset the losses, non-revenue water has a direct impact on the bottom line of municipal water systems. However, utility managers now have an opportunity to reverse the problem with advanced flow meter technology that combines multiple measurements.

  • Groundwater Treatment Pilot Test Program Proves Successful In California (Loprest)
    Groundwater Treatment Pilot Test Program Proves Successful In California (Loprest)

    Iron, manganese, arsenic and hydrogen sulfide are indigenous to numerous groundwater aquifers. With the exception of arsenic, these constituents are more prevalent in deeper aquifers that are devoid of dissolved oxygen. This report summarizes the results and conclusions of a groundwater treatment pilot test program. This pilot test program was undertaken to determine the removal performance for arsenic, manganese and iron at the City of Merced’s Well 20 site. Chemical treatment processes required were also studied.

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