DRINKING WATER

Preparing For “The Big One” – Protecting The Nation’s Water Infrastructure
Preparing For “The Big One” – Protecting The Nation’s Water Infrastructure

The long holiday weekend was filled with news about seismic activity in California and Nevada. An original jolt on Thursday was followed by thousands of aftershocks and an even stronger 7.1 quake on Friday, and tremblers are expected to continue for days.

DRINKING WATER CASE STUDIES AND WHITE PAPERS

More Drinking Water Case Studies and White Papers

DRINKING WATER APPLICATION NOTES

  • Application Note: Employing Best Water Quality Monitoring Practices To Reduce Runoff During Construction Under proposed EPA stormwater runoff guidelines, construction site operators will be required to actively monitor or sample stormwater discharges daily. The enhanced effluent rules take effect in August 2011 for construction sites that disturb 20 or more acres and February 2014 for sites that disturb 10 or more acres, and they may stipulate a strict numerical limit of less than 280 NTU for average turbidity (sediment in water) on any day. By YSI
  • Dissolved Oxygen Measurement

    One of the most important measurements in the determination of the health of a body of water is its dissolved oxygen content. The quantity of dissolved oxygen in water is normally expressed in parts per million (ppm) by weight and is due to the solubility of oxygen from the atmosphere around us.

  • Phosphate In Groundwater And Surface Water: A Rapid And Reliable Determination Method Using The Photometric Spectroquant® Test

    Phosphorus is an essential element for organisms and plants. In natural, uncontaminated waters, it occurs as organically bound phosphate, condensed phosphates or as orthophosphate — often referred to by its chemical formula PO4-P. The small quantity of phosphorus present in natural waters does not promote the growth of plants. However, a rise in the concentration of phosphorus results in the proliferation of algae, which leads to the eutrophication of the water body.

  • Accurate Flowmetering For Enhanced Water Network Performance

    Being able to accurately measure both the quantity and rate of water passing through a water distribution system is crucial to gaining an informed understanding of overall efficiency. As such, achieving a measurement that is exact as possible can have a significant impact on key areas including supply planning, maintenance and resource deployment, leakage detection and rectification and the overall environment, in terms of controlling abstraction and reducing unnecessary draw on natural resources.

  • Application Note: YSI Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring And The IPSWATCH-EMPACT Program The Ipswich and Parker Rivers watersheds lie only a short distance north of Boston, MA. The first settlements in these watersheds began in the early 1600s. Since that time, residents have relied heavily on the natural resources of the Parker and Ipswich Rivers, their coastal estuaries and Plum Island Sound, which is known as the Great Marsh. This ecosystem has been designated and protected by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as an Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC).
  • ABB Aztec 600 Manganese Analyzer Optimizing Manganese Removal Efficiency

    The task of managing the quantity and quality of potable water is unimaginable without online instrumentation to help water utilities to measure, treat and deliver drinking water to consumers. ABB’s Aztec 600 colorimetric and ion-selective electrode (ISE) analyzers have been designed to measure the key parameters that affect water quality – aluminium, iron, manganese, phosphate, color, ammonia and fluoride.

  • Determination Of Hexanal In Foods Utilizing Dynamic Headspace

    Hexanal is one of many well-documented aromatic components that contribute to flavor and aroma in common consumer food products containing omega-6 fatty acids. Hexanal content is also used to measure the oxidative status of foods rich in omega-6 fatty acids.

  • TOC Analysis: The Best Tool In A Drinking Water Facility’s Toolbox

    SUEZ Water Technologies & Solutions designs and manufactures Sievers Total Organic Carbon (TOC) Analyzers that enable near real-time reporting of organic carbon levels for treatment optimization, quality control & regulatory compliance. TOC has a wide range of applicability at a drinking water plant, and therefore any drinking water utility — large or small — can measure TOC in their laboratory or online in their treatment process.

  • Application Note: Vertical Profiling Safeguards Drinking Water And Sheds Light On Cyanobacteria A search for algal toxins in North Carolina reservoirs has evolved into an ongoing early warning system for three important drinking water reservoirs—which serve two large cities—and yielded a greater understanding of the dynamics of blue-green algae, or cyanobacteria, in the state’s reservoir system. By YSI
  • How To Install A Submersible Pump In Discharge Tubes

    In the fields of water and waste water technology, submersible pumps represent a viable economic and technical alternative to conventional, dry-installed pumps. In particular, they offer a number of handling advantages during maintenance and installation work, a factor of increasing importance in times of general staff cutbacks by operating companies.

More Drinking Water Application Notes

DRINKING WATER PRODUCTS

Aqua ElectrOzone™ Ozone Generation System Aqua ElectrOzone™ Ozone Generation System

Ozone treatment for water and wastewater has been utilized successfully for several decades and continues to be a viable disinfection solution for both municipal and industrial plants, worldwide.

Aqua-Jet® SS-PW Surface Aerator For THM Removal Aqua-Jet® SS-PW Surface Aerator For THM Removal

The Aqua-Jet® SS-PW surface mechanical aerator, manufactured by Aqua-Aerobic Systems is certified to NSF/ANSI 61 by UL for use in potable water applications. These units can be utilized for THM stripping applications or circulation in potable water treatment systems and reservoirs with a minimum volume of 100,000 gallons.

FlexRake® Low Flow & Washer Compactor Package FlexRake® Low Flow & Washer Compactor Package

Pre-engineered, fully automated, low maintenance system for applications with average flows of 1 MGD or less; and up to 4 MGD. Proven FlexRake technology is paired with a perfectly-sized washer compactor to seamlessly remove, clean, compress and discharge screenings 10 ft in any direction.

JCM 414 Fabricated Mechanical Joint Tapping Sleeve JCM 414 Fabricated Mechanical Joint Tapping Sleeve

This tapping sleeve combines the high strength and versatility of fabricated steel with the traditional side and end gasketed mechanical joint design.

4"-12" Resilient Wedge Gate Valves with ALPHA™ Restrained Joint Ends 4"-12" Resilient Wedge Gate Valves with ALPHA™ Restrained Joint Ends

The AMERICAN Series 2500 Ductile Iron Resilient Wedge Gate Valve is available with ALPHA ends in sizes 4” -12”. The valve is designed for use in drinking water, sewage and fire protection systems as well as irrigation and backflow control systems.

Seeq Organizer Seeq Organizer

Organizer is Seeq’s application for engineers and managers to assemble and distribute Seeq analyses as reports, dashboards, and web pages.

More Products

LATEST INSIGHTS ON DRINKING WATER

  • How To Use ATP And DNA In A Wastewater Nitrification Monitoring Plan
    How To Use ATP And DNA In A Wastewater Nitrification Monitoring Plan

    Ammonia removal is a key metric for assessing wastewater treatment facility performance. This is because ammonia contributes to aquatic life toxicity. Furthermore, nitrogen, along with phosphorus, is a driver of receiving water eutrophication. Eutrophication, which simply is an over-enrichment of nutrients, can be detrimental to environmental and public health. It can result in harmful algae blooms, dissolved oxygen depletion, fish kills, and other damaging impacts.

  • We Use Satellites To Measure Water Scarcity
    We Use Satellites To Measure Water Scarcity

    Determining whether a region has sufficient water to satisfy the needs of people who live there is a complicated and imperfect process. Our research team has developed a new approach to measure water scarcity by using satellites hundreds of miles in space.

  • 4 Benefits Of Utilizing Reverse Osmosis Wastewater Treatment For Reuse
    4 Benefits Of Utilizing Reverse Osmosis Wastewater Treatment For Reuse

    When a municipality or business wants to reuse their wastewater, some applications require more treatment than others due to the quality of the wastewater. Many standard wastewater treatment systems consist of pretreatment, primary treatment, and secondary treatment stages. By the end of the secondary stage, a majority of the pollutants, solids, organics, inorganics, and metals have been removed or reduced. This is where reverse osmosis wastewater treatment can be utilized in a third stage process.

  • Wildfires: How Do They Affect Our Water Supplies?
    Wildfires: How Do They Affect Our Water Supplies?

    Wildfire is a natural part of many ecosystems, but recently these fires have become more severe, burning more acres and causing destruction in the western parts of the United States. Recently, U.S. EPA researchers have begun to look at the impact of these fires on our water supply, the natural resource we depend on for drinking, irrigation, fishing, and recreation.

  • What Are The Environmental Considerations Of A Seawater Treatment Plant?
    What Are The Environmental Considerations Of A Seawater Treatment Plant?

    A seawater treatment plant was designed as one of the solutions to the recent water scarcity problems. Fresh and drinkable water isn’t easy to find in some places. As the world’s population grows and industrial production increases, even the largest of the world’s freshwater sources can eventually become strained. Therefore, desalination is meant to expand our sources of water across the world.

  • Drilling Deeper Wells Is A Band-Aid Solution To U.S. Groundwater Woes
    Drilling Deeper Wells Is A Band-Aid Solution To U.S. Groundwater Woes

    With memories of the wettest U.S. spring on record still fresh, it seems strange to hear that in many parts of the nation, groundwater supplies — the water stored underneath our feet, in rocks, and sediments — are lower than normal. This includes places with wet climates, such as southern Georgia, coastal Maryland, and Cleveland.

More Drinking Water Features

DRINKING WATER VIDEOS

Resource Revolution: The Energy/Water Nexus In Unconventional Oil & Gas - Highlights

GE partnered with the Wharton School's Initiative for Global Environmental Leadership (IGEL) for an industry leaders' discussion about the energy/water nexus in unconventional oil & gas production.

Kate Orff: Reviving New York's Rivers -- With Oysters!

Architect Kate Orff sees the oyster as an agent of urban change. Bundled into beds and sunk into city rivers, oysters slurp up pollution and make legendarily dirty waters clean — thus driving even more innovation in "oyster-tecture." Orff shares her vision for an urban landscape that links nature and humanity for mutual benefit.

Introducing EXO - A New, State-Of-The-Art Water Monitoring Platform Video Introducing EXO - A New, State-Of-The-Art Water Monitoring Platform Video

EXO, a state-of-the art water quality monitoring platform, is designed to address the many challenges of collecting accurate field data in the natural environment.

Low Flow Sampling Using A TROLL® 9500 Water Quality Instrument

The TROLL® 9500 Water Quality Instrument simplifies multiparameter monitoring. The TROLL 9500 is a powerful, portable unit that houses up to nine water quality sensors, internal power, and optional data logging capabilities.

Expanded Version-Jason 3-Continuing Decades Of Ocean Surface Measurements

Did you know satellites can measure Earth’s oceans from space? The Jason-3 satellite, set to launch in July 2015, will collect critical sea surface height data, adding to a satellite data record going back to 1992.

More Drinking Water Videos

ABOUT DRINKING WATER

In most developed countries, drinking water is regulated to ensure that it meets drinking water quality standards. In the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers these standards under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)

Drinking water considerations can be divided into three core areas of concern:

  1. Source water for a community’s drinking water supply
  2. Drinking water treatment of source water
  3. Distribution of treated drinking water to consumers

Drinking Water Sources

Source water access is imperative to human survival. Sources may include groundwater from aquifers, surface water from rivers and streams and seawater through a desalination process. Direct or indirect water reuse is also growing in popularity in communities with limited access to sources of traditional surface or groundwater. 

Source water scarcity is a growing concern as populations grow and move to warmer, less aqueous climates; climatic changes take place and industrial and agricultural processes compete with the public’s need for water. The scarcity of water supply and water conservation are major focuses of the American Water Works Association.

Drinking Water Treatment

Drinking Water Treatment involves the removal of pathogens and other contaminants from source water in order to make it safe for humans to consume. Treatment of public drinking water is mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the U.S. Common examples of contaminants that need to be treated and removed from water before it is considered potable are microorganisms, disinfectants, disinfection byproducts, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals and radionuclides.

There are a variety of technologies and processes that can be used for contaminant removal and the removal of pathogens to decontaminate or treat water in a drinking water treatment plant before the clean water is pumped into the water distribution system for consumption.

The first stage in treating drinking water is often called pretreatment and involves screens to remove large debris and objects from the water supply. Aeration can also be used in the pretreatment phase. By mixing air and water, unwanted gases and minerals are removed and the water improves in color, taste and odor.

The second stage in the drinking water treatment process involves coagulation and flocculation. A coagulating agent is added to the water which causes suspended particles to stick together into clumps of material called floc. In sedimentation basins, the heavier floc separates from the water supply and sinks to form sludge, allowing the less turbid water to continue through the process.

During the filtration stage, smaller particles not removed by flocculation are removed from the treated water by running the water through a series of filters. Filter media can include sand, granulated carbon or manufactured membranes. Filtration using reverse osmosis membranes is a critical component of removing salt particles where desalination is being used to treat brackish water or seawater into drinking water.

Following filtration, the water is disinfected to kill or disable any microbes or viruses that could make the consumer sick. The most traditional disinfection method for treating drinking water uses chlorine or chloramines. However, new drinking water disinfection methods are constantly coming to market. Two disinfection methods that have been gaining traction use ozone and ultra-violet (UV) light to disinfect the water supply.

Drinking Water Distribution

Drinking water distribution involves the management of flow of the treated water to the consumer. By some estimates, up to 30% of treated water fails to reach the consumer. This water, often called non-revenue water, escapes from the distribution system through leaks in pipelines and joints, and in extreme cases through water main breaks.

A public water authority manages drinking water distribution through a network of pipes, pumps and valves and monitors that flow using flow, level and pressure measurement sensors and equipment.

Water meters and metering systems such as automatic meter reading (AMR) and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) allows a water utility to assess a consumer’s water use and charge them for the correct amount of water they have consumed.